Pme Read300Bovine Read300Bovine Read300aBovine Read300a

Roxell

Using high-tech tools, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their cooperators have taken a deep dive into the microbial "soup" of the cow's rumen, the first of four stomach chambers where tough plant fibers are turned into nutrients and energy.

Ultimately, such efforts could lead to new ways of ensuring the health and wellbeing of cows as well as improving their production of milk, meat and other products, noted Derek Bickhart, a research microbiologist with ARS' U.S. Dairy Forage Research Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

Join us for the International Dairy Conference and the Animal Production in the United Arab Emirates Conference at EuroTier Middle East 2019 from 2 – 4 September in Abu Dhabi

Due to the expanding population, development of retail opportunities and the popularity of new product lines such as flavoured milk and yogurt, the dairy sector in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region is booming.

EASY AND FUNCTIONAL STAINLESS STEEL MINI PASTEURIZER

PROVIDED WITH ELECTRIC HEATING IN A WATER BATH WITH DOUBLE WALL, ELECTRONIC THERMOSTAT, PROBE FOR PRODUCT, DRAIN VALVE FOR PRODUCT, MANUAL MANAGEMENT OF THE HEATING AND COOLING PHASES.

 



A blueprint published today prioritizes animal genomics research over the next 10 years to help producers meet the needs of a growing world population.

COLOCARE: The pasteurizer for colostrum

SIMPLE AND EFFECTIVE

Characteristics:

Pasteurizer, specific for colostrum treatment, COLOCARE SERIES are suitable and effective to pasteurize the colostrum contained in special bags. The machine is capable of performing the thermal cycles: Heating and pasteurization of the colostrum without damaging its essential component consisting of the immuno-globulins.

The Ministry of agriculture has prepared a draft document approving the list of controlled goods for which veterinary accompanying documents can be issued by certified veterinarians who are not authorized by organizations included in the system of the State veterinary service of the Russian Federation, reports The DairyNews.

 Photo:  Cattle in a feedlot.

By Ann Perry
October 1, 2014

 

A recent study conducted by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists indicated that just three compounds in beef manure were responsible for generating over two-thirds of detectable odors.


An Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-led team has completed a comprehensive life-cycle analysis quantifying the resource use and various environmental emissions of beef cattle production in the United States. The aim is to establish baseline measures that the U.S. beef industry can use to explore ways of reducing its environmental footprint and improve sustainability.

Photo: Two cows and calf in a field. Link to photo information

By Sandra Avant

April 21, 2014

One reason why some cows cannot get pregnant may be because they have male (Y) chromosome fragments in their DNA, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study.
Reproductive efficiency is the most economically important trait in cow-calf production. When a cow does not produce a calf, the producer does not make a profit, but still has to pay for feed, labor and other expenses.

Cattle in a field. Link to photo information By Sandra Avant

 

January 12, 2016

Despite a successful program to eliminate cattle fever ticks during the first half of the 20th century, these ticks still manage to cross the Mexican border into Texas. A new vaccine developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) could control these pests and help prevent a reinfestation of cattle fever ticks in the United States. These ticks can transmit pathogens that cause bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis—diseases that can kill cattle.

 Photo: A lateral flow device containing a test strip that can identify botulinum toxin in less than 20 minutes.  Link to photo informationBy Marcia Wood

February 7, 2014

Botulism, the sometimes deadly illness commonly associated with botched home-canning or other stored-food mishaps, has a new face. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) molecular biologist Robert M. Hnasko, botulism today is both a food safety and a homeland security concern because bioterrorists could—using the natural toxins that cause botulism—make everyday foods and beverages deadly. The nerve-damaging toxins, called neurotoxins, are produced by a common soil-dwelling bacterium, Clostridium botulinum, and several of its close relatives. 

Hnasko works for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.

We have 647 guests and no members online