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Roxell

 National U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) survey, published recently in Plant Disease, provides the first large-scale, systematic insight into how wheat and barley growers manage Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as scab, and where they get information on how to control this destructive disease.

Today, Roxell, the leading manufacturer of automatic feeding, drinking, nesting and heating systems, is launching the Shen-Turbo 100, a space heater that generates more heat with 80,000 BTU/h of propane than similarly sized heaters on the market. The compact Shen-Turbo 100 is a new addition to Roxell's range of convection heaters. Shen-Turbo provides a solution to a number of specific needs of pig and poultry farmers.

 Photo: Two hands holding a cluster of fungus-free channel catfish eggs. Link to photo information

By Sandra Avant
February 18, 2015

A disinfectant has the potential to treat fungus on catfish eggs, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research.

March 15, 2017

A Mississippi-based Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researcher has learned that using poultry litter as fertilizer can help cotton growers in the Southeast maximize profits.

Poultry litter (chicken manure, spilled feed, excess feathers, and other poultry-house materials) contains nitrogen and phosphorus—both important crop nutrients. Applying poultry litter to the soil also recycles some of the tons of litter generated annually by poultry operations throughout the United States, says Haile Tewolde, an ARS agronomist at Mississippi State.

 Photo: Rainbow trout. By Sandra Avant

October 3, 2014

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are taking their studies to the field to gauge the survival rate of a new line of rainbow trout that is resistant to bacterial cold-water disease.

 Photo: Catfish fingerlings. Link to photo informationBy Sandra Avant

June 23, 2015

Water hardness can influence the development of columnaris disease in catfish, according to a study by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists found a difference in disease development in fish exposed to hard and soft water containing the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare, which causes columnaris disease

 Photo: Poultry litter being incorporated into the soil during disking of a field.  Link to photo informationBy Dennis O'Brien

September 24, 2014

Using poultry litter as fertilizer is a welcome trend in many southern states because that is where most of the U.S. broiler chickens are produced. The litter's nitrogen content helps boost crop yields, and also helps reduce farmers' expenses for commercial fertilizers. But a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) agronomist has found that many farmers in Mississippi may be applying litter at the wrong time of year.

 Microbiologist Qingzhong Yu examining recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccine candidates in infected cells. Link to photo information

By Sharon Durham

March 20, 2015

A vaccine that protects chickens against two infectious poultry diseases has been developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

 Photo: Eggs in an egg crate. Link to photo information  By Marcia Wood

March 31, 2014

Classic Caesar salad, old-fashioned eggnog, some homemade ice cream—and many other popular foods—may contain raw eggs. Now, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-led research has produced a faster way to pasteurize raw, in-shell eggs without ruining their taste, texture, color or other important qualities.

 

 

 Photo: A new ARS-developed sorghum variety growing next to a conventional variety in a breeder's field. Link to photo information

By Sharon Durham
February 6, 2015

A new sorghum plant developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists can produce more seeds than conventional varieties currently grown by farmers.

Photo: ARS microbiologist Darrell Kapczynski gives a baby chick a vaccine against Newcastle disease. Link to photo information    

By Sandra Avant

March 24, 2014

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have given the Newcastle disease classification system a much-needed update, making it easier to identify virus types.

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